Video Summary: 7 ways games reward the brain | Tom Chatfield | TEDGlobal 2010


    Video Summary: 7 ways games reward the brain | Tom Chatfield | TEDGlobal 2010

  • 1 Tom said the gaming industry is the fastest growing media industry

    Tom said that the gaming industry was worth $10 billion in 1990 and it's worth $50 billion globally in 2010, with no sign of slowing down. He said that it was estimated to be worth $80 billion by 2014. This makes it the fastest growing media industry.

  • 2 Tom said two processes occur in the player's mind - wanting and liking - which combine to form a very intense emotional engagement

    Players became engaged with games by wanting and liking processes. Wanting makes the person become ambitious and drives them on. Liking makes the person enjoy the game and its elements. He mentions the ability to fly in an online game, World of Warcraft.

  • 3 Tom said games are like opening boxes to find a reward inside

    Tom calls games 'box openers' where millions of players open boxes hoping to find a better reward. The games can adjust their reward system so to keep the perfect balance between special rewards and motivating the player to continue playing.

  • 4 Tom said games reward the brain with experience progress bars

    Tom said the first way games reward the brain is through experience bars measuring progress. Players see their game avatars constantly progressing small increments which they feel are their own.

  • 5 Tom said games reward the brain by giving players lots of different short term tasks

    Tom said the second way games reward the brain is by giving players many different short term tasks. He said collecting 5,000 pies would be a boring task, while 15 pies would be much more interesting.

  • 6 Tom said games reward the brain by rewarding effort

    Tom said the third way games reward the brain is by rewarding effort and not punishing failure. Every little thing the player tries yields some sort of small benefit.

  • 7 Tom said games reward the brain by giving feedback to players

    Tom said the fourth way games reward the brain is by giving feedback to players as a response to players' actions. He mentioned how things like global warming and pollution are hard to relate to because the consequences are in a distant time and space, but games show consequences almost immediately.

  • 8 Tom said games reward the brain by uncertainty

    Tom said the fifth way games reward the brain is by using uncertainty, regarding whether a reward will be given to the player. He said that when we are unable to predict something perfectly, we get excited about it.

  • 9 Tom said games reward the brain by making players show off their achievements

    Tom said the sixth way games reward the brain is by making players have an audience which can see their progress and accomplishments. He also mentions how games influence levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with reward-seeking behavior.

  • 10 Tom said games reward the brain by having fair play systems developed by the community

    Tom said the seventh way games reward the brain is by employing fair play systems developed by the community, which ensure that all players are rewarded in virtual currency even if the in-game rewards are inadequate. He said that this player-developed system is used by millions of players.

  • 11 Tom said that game elements could be implemented in business and politics

    Tom said the methods games use to engage players could be used to enhance a business or a political decision. He said we could break things down into highly calibrated small tasks, reward effort consistently as everything fields together and so on.

  • 12 Tom finished by saying that learning lessons from player behavior could be revolutionary

    Tom finished by focusing on 'engagement' and said that observing what reasons make people tick, work, play and engage on a grand scale in games could be revolutionary.